‘You Feel Invisible’: How America’s Fastest-Growing Immigrant Group Is Being Left Out Of the DACA Conversation

In IMMIGRATION -- articles only, Judiciary and Courts On

Anthony Ngwho came to the United States from the Philippines with his parents at age 12, has been trying to steady himself over the past several weeks as his emotions have run high and low while waiting for President Trump to announce his decision on whether to repeal the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA. On Tuesday, Trump said the program, which protects 690,000 undocumented immigrants who were minors when their families brought them to the United States from deportation, would end in six months. He has urged Congress to come up with another plan to allow DACA recipients to remain in the country.

Ng and his sister are DACA recipients who settled with their parents in Los Angeles. Ng’s mother has a green card, and his older brother is a citizen through marriage. His father has since passed away.

After graduating from the University of California at Irvine, Ng worked as a policy advocate at Asian Americans Advancing Justice — Los Angeles, a nonprofit civil rights organization. He lobbies elected officials on policies to protect and expand immigrant rights.

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